Sip, Sip Hooray! The Beauty of Fruit-Forward Wines

November 26, 2018

Wines are totemic symbols that mark the end of a territory and the beginning of a new one.

When it comes to comprehending where wines originated and where do we get what we drink from, it is important to understand the concept of Old World and New World.

 

 

 

The Old World were regions of the Earth where it was claimed that winemaking originally began using Vitis vinifera grapes. These countries included some names like France, Italy, Greece, Germany and Portugal.

 

New World countries, on the contrary, were places that imported vinifera grapes and also in fact, the practice of winemaking. The New World included areas like U.S., South Africa, New Zealand, Australia and Chile.

 

Not only were these ‘Worlds’ poles apart, but their wines also tasted of the uniqueness of each!

There are a lot of distinctions between the varieties within this monosyllabic term. Old World and New World wines are quite different in their tastes because of a lot of factors. New World varieties are infused with a fruity tinge which, as the style term goes, makes the wine fruit-forward.

Here is all you need to know about the fruit-forward New World wines.

 

Fruit Fusion in the New World

 

Fruit-forward wines differ from the Old World taste because of the kind of grapes that are used while making them. This type has acquired prominence in the New World varieties because of its unique flavor.

The fruity essence in the wine comes from over-ripened grapes growing in the warmer regions. Since ripened grapes are more acidic in nature, fruity flavors were mixed with the contents to neutralize the taste.

 

What’s On the Other Side

 

Terrain and taste is not all that is different between the Old World and the New World. Old World wines have been known to have lower alcohol content with high acidity and only a faint hint of fruitiness. This made the drink lighter compared to its ‘New-er’ counterpart, which has a dominant fruity taste with more alcohol, and a riper yet less acidic flavor.